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Windows 10 upgrade warning/concern

OP
leeshor

leeshor

Well-Known Member
I'm a Microsoft OEM and Microsoft System Builder Partner. The Windows I have in my office that I install on systems don't come both ways. The packages I have state x64. If I were to for some reason need x32 Windows I would need to purchase it. It's the same reason the Insider site has both 64-bit and 32-bit downloads.
 

Russ

Active Member
I'm a Microsoft OEM and Microsoft System Builder Partner. The Windows I have in my office that I install on systems don't come both ways. The packages I have state x64. If I were to for some reason need x32 Windows I would need to purchase it. It's the same reason the Insider site has both 64-bit and 32-bit downloads.

Leeshor --

Well, YMMV, but if you walk over to my office with me, I can hand you about a dozen Win7 & Win8 packages that contain discs for both 32 & 64 bit installs, but only one key.

I'm neither an OEM nor a Partner, but I have kinda been doin' this stuff for a long time.

Happy Independence Day,
Russ
 
OP
leeshor

leeshor

Well-Known Member
Well, what you say is true, however, it requires a consumer, "boxed", retail package. The OEM Windows has never worked that way.
 

Russ

Active Member
a. it requires a consumer, "boxed", retail package.
b. The OEM Windows has never worked that way.

Leeshor --

a. No, not really. I also bought a lot of keys online from MS directly (both Win7 & 8) with no software delivery involved, and there was no requirement to specify 32 or 64. The key didn't care. Then, as I moved away from 32-bit, I would do a clean install of 64-bit on the same machine, and use the same key previously used with 32-bit, with no validation problems. That is when I figured out, as you reported, that MS was tracking a "hardware signature" for activation.

As I replaced machines with newer and better stuff, I would have to go thru an "extended validation process," but that was clearly because I had changed the hardware signature. I would occasionally have two substantially identical machines -- motherboard, video card, etc. -- and I found that I could move a drive from one to the other without problem as long as I wasn't running the same key on two different, although identical, machines at the same time. It was a "learn as you go" process.

I don't know if my recent problem with my office computer is a 32/64 issue or not. I'll find out next time I boot Win10 on that machine. I have some unused Win8 & 8.1 keys, so I will try one of those. I'll let you know if it works.

b. I dunno; never been one. I just take the term "avid hobbyist" to a whole new level, as I continue to upgrade my own collection and deal out the abandoned ones to local youth organizations, or similar

Take care,
Russ
 

Russ

Active Member
More 32 Bit Vs. 64 Bit information here:/

Spider --

Thanks. I know there is no upgrade path from 32 to 64. That has been true since 64 was introduced in WinXP.

My struggle was to get Win10 to accept the Product Key from the 32-bit Win8.1 in a cloned drive. Turned out my problem had nothing to do with 32/64. The problem was that I had cloned a drive that was running Windows Media Center. Win10 is not real fond of Media Center. I cloned a different drive and it worked fine.

Take care,
Russ
 
Last edited:

Spider

Super Moderator
Staff member
Russ,

Glad to hear you've got it sorted out now.:)

Windows Media Center will be a show stopper for upgrading my W7 Ultimate laptop to WX. I'm using it primarily as a DVR, and Windows Media Center is about the only thing I run on it.:(
 

Russ

Active Member
Russ,

Glad to hear you've got it sorted out now.:)

Windows Media Center will be a show stopper for upgrading my W7 Ultimate laptop to WX.:(

Spider --

It should upgrade Ok. My problem was that I introduced too many variables into the mix. I cloned the Windows Media Center 8.1 drive (Machine A), then moved it to another machine (Machine B) where I upgraded it to Win10. There was a message during the upgrade process about Windows Media Center not being acceptable, but I don't remember what it said because I didn't care. Other than that, the upgrade seemed Ok. Then I moved it to my office computer (Machine C) and tried to change the product key to match the 8.1 key (32-bit) in Machine C. It would not accept the change.

If all that movement sounds crazy, it's because my office computer lives under a table between my desk and the wall, and physical access is a real nuisance.

My "solution" was to start over with an 8.1 drive from a non-Media Center machine and do the upgrade in the destination machine. That worked fine, and it accepted the product key change. I now have 32-bit 8.1 and 64-bit Win10 running on that machine on separate drives with BIOS selectable boot. I will gradually install my "office specific" programs on the Win10 drive, but that will be a series of rainy day projects.

Machine A is my "main computer" and is the one I use most. It is in my living room and is also my DVR. I have all my movies stored on it. I use Plex to deliver the media over the network to a Roku3 on the TV. I don't think I even need Media Center anymore, with the Plex/Roku combination, but don't yet know if I can revert back to non-Media Center OS. I have not upgraded that machine to Win10, but will definitely try a cloned drive first when I do get around to it. I will experiment first, so if I learn anything useful, I'll let you know.

Take care,
Russ
 

bender

Member
So, my clean install of windows 10 preview will stop working and I have to recover my Windows 8.1 to get full Windows 10? Doesn't it sound really confusing?
 
OP
leeshor

leeshor

Well-Known Member
So, my clean install of windows 10 preview will stop working and I have to recover my Windows 8.1 to get full Windows 10? Doesn't it sound really confusing?
Not to me. You certainly can do a clean install of 10 only after you have first upgraded. Your other option is to purchase a retail copy.
 

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